Athletics: Kenya names London lineup after meeting anti-doping deadline

NAIROBI (Reuters) – Kenya announced the final list of competitors heading to next month’s world athletics championships in London, with double Olympic 800 meters gold medalist and world champion David Rudisha flying the flag.

The announcement came after Kenya failed to meet two deadlines to submit anti-doping materials, under a strict new testing regime, because some athletes were racing in the Diamond League circuit.

They were given a final deadline of Saturday, according to the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya.

“We are happy to announce that all the doping procedures have been completed today and we are ready to depart for London on Tuesday,” Jackson Tuwei, Athletics Kenya chairman, told reporters.

Kenya’s reputation for middle and long distance running has been tarnished by failed doping tests among its elite athletes, including former three-times Boston and Chicago marathon winner, Rita Jeptoo, and Jemimah Sumgong, the first Kenyan female to win an Olympics marathon gold medal.

The International Association of Athletics Federations has demanded that each Kenyan athlete must submit to three urine tests and one blood test.

Middle-distance runners Ferguson Rotich, Kipyegon Bett and Emmanuel Korir will be heading to London but Michael Saruni will not.

“Technical officials have advised us that his form is wanting,” Tuwei said.

Another to miss the trip is Nicholas Bett, the defending 400 meter hurdles champion who was ruled out due to injury.

Renewable energy, anti-doping to take centre stage at Sliz

EMBRACING renewable energy in sport as well as anti-doping will take centre stage at the fourth edition of the Sports Leaders’ Institute of Zimbabwe (SLIZ) Winter Camp that starts today and ends on Sunday in Kariba.Sliz has invited a United Kingdom-based energy expert Noboth Gaza to present a plenary on how sport can benefit from renewable energy.

Gaza of Solarlux Solutions International will speak on the relation between sports and renewable energy, especially in rural areas that have no access to electricity.

“Our rural areas lag behind in sports development because as a country we are still far from embracing renewable energy such as solar. If solar energy is embraced in sports, then we should start seeing schools using electronic scoreboards in athletics, soccer and basketball. Gaza will speak on the need to embrace renewable energy in sports. If properly embraced, some schools might even benefit from organisations that might want to hire their facilities for evening training sessions in the event that their lights are solar powered,” said Russell Mhiribidi.

In Bulawayo, Football for Hope Centre, operated by Grassroots Soccer Zimbabwe, is one facility that has embraced renewable energy, with solar powered lights illuminating the ground used for five-a-side soccer.

The winter camp will draw participants from colleges, universities, secondary and primary schools, sporting associations and clubs, as well as sports officers from government arms, such as the Zimbabwe Prisons and Correctional Services and the police.

The organisers of the camp have also invited Marketers’ Association of Zimbabwe (Maz) to give participants tips on understanding brand value and attract partners.

“The aim is to give participants a different dimension on sports issues. The world is changing and renewable energy is the in-thing, hence the need to embrace it in sports development. We’ve also noted that clubs and sporting associations don’t understand their brand value and many a times are exploited by the so-called sponsors, who happen to give them donations. There’s a difference between sponsorship and donations, which is what we want sports leaders to understand. Guarding against ambush marketing is another thing that people from Maz will tackle,” said Mhiribidi.

Former Caps United and Buymore FC footballer More Moyo, a Maz board member, will present on the marketing subject.

The keynote speaker is the director of Anti-Doping Education and Research at the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) Agnes Wanjiku Mandu.

Officials from the Sports and Recreation Commission and the Sport and Recreation Ministry will also make presentations at the winter camp. — @ZililoR.

UKAD Issues Urgent Wake-Up Call as Doping Stories Hit Public Trust in the Integrity of Sport

UK Anti-Doping (UKAD) Chief Executive, Nicole Sapstead, has expressed fears for the future of public engagement with sport in the UK, unless the battle against cheats is stepped up on all fronts, following new research for National Clean Sport Week into how doping stories are affecting public confidence in sport.

Sapstead believes that, in addition to the education and intelligence-led testing of athletes, much more must be done to educate society in general about clean sport if faith in the probity of sport is to be restored.

The research published today by UKAD shows two thirds of the British public (66%) think that stories about an elite athlete or athletes doping in sport have had a negative impact on their trust in the integrity of sport.

In addition, nearly half of British adults (48%) say that high-profile stories on doping in sport make them think that doping is widespread.

The study commissioned by UKAD, and carried out by ComRes, has been released today to mark the start of National Clean Sport Week (10-17 July), a campaign to highlight the extensive work being done by UKAD and its partners to ensure sport in the UK is clean.

Nicole Sapstead said: “We are at a critical point in the fight against doping and unless action is stepped up across all sports, at all levels, to help us fight the cheats, we may find that both sports audiences and participation decrease in the future.

“It’s worrying that so many people are losing their trust in the integrity of sport because of stories they see in the media, which are making them believe doping is more widespread than it actually is.

“This isn’t the true picture in Britain, but the public don’t know about the reality. That’s why we’re launching National Clean Sport Week, to highlight the facts and the work we’re doing to keep sport clean in the UK.”

The National Clean Sport Week research found that nearly two thirds of British adults (65%) think that doping is more widespread amongst elite athletes in other countries than in Britain. While three fifths (60%) believe that Britain has stricter rules, better education and testing for elite athletes to prevent doping in sport than other countries.

UKAD and its partners are supporting athletes from grassroots to elite level through one of the world’s most extensive education and intelligence-led testing programmes. It has 40 National Trainers who deliver clean sport education, over 200 Doping Control Personnel, who work as part of the sample collection process and over 2,300 Accredited Advisors around the UK.

Since its inception in 2009, UKAD has conducted over 58,000 tests across over 50 sports and has prosecuted 194 Anti-Doping Rule Violations.

Some of Britain’s best known elite sports stars are backing National Clean Sport Week, along with 30 national governing bodies of sport, the British Olympic Association, British Paralympic Association, DCMS, and UK Sport.

Olympic gold medal winning hockey player, Kate Richardson-Walsh OBE said: “National Clean Sport Week is so important to get people talking. Spread the information, spread the knowledge to the athletes, that are already well informed, and the public generally, about how much testing goes on, how much education we are given, how much knowledge there is throughout UK, to make sure we are competing on that clean level.”

Three-time Olympic rowing gold medallist and member of the UKAD Athlete Committee Andrew T Hodge OBE said: “It gives me a sense of enormous pride that I can prove on a regular basis that I’m a clean athlete. If you look at what we had 10 / 20 years ago we’ve stepped forward enormously. To see that continual process of improvement, development, increasing our standards, shows great testament to the efforts and the work that goes on behind the scenes. Next year and the years to come we’ve got to push on, we’ve got to improve those standards and keep that message going.”

Paralympic power lifting world champion Ali Jawad said: “’I’ve been an elite athlete for 12 years and UKAD has educated me on anti-doping, the rules, what’s required from us and what they can support me with, every year. For me it’s been invaluable.”

To find out more about National Clean Sport Week visit ukad.org.uk/cleansportweek or join in the conversation using #CleanSportUK

NGBs and organisations supporting National Clean Sport Week include:

Archery GB
Badminton England
Basketball England
British Bobsleigh & Skeleton Association
British Canoeing
British Cycling
British Equestrian Federation
British Fencing
British Gymnastics
British Judo
British Olympic Association
British Paralympic Association
British Rowing
British Shooting
British Swimming
British Taekwondo
British Triathlon
British Weightlifting
British Wrestling
Commonwealth Games England
Commonwealth Games NI
DCMS
England Boxing
England Cricket Board
England Hockey
English Institute of Sport
London Marathon Events
LTA
Pentathlon GB
RFL
RFU
RYA
Sport England
Sport Northern Ireland
Sportscotland
Sport Wales
Table Tennis England
The FA
UK Athletics
UK Sport
Volleyball England
WRU

Where are the athletes running to? Update your ‘whereabouts’, ADAK appeals to Team Kenya members

Where are the athletes running to?

Team manager Maswai said no athlete will travel to London if they fail to meet IAAF rules.

Absenteeism of athletes in the Kenyan camp ahead of the 2017 London World Championships is making the mandatory doping test by the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) a hectic process.

The regulator has appealed to athletes to update their whereabouts, failing which they will be punished, in accordance with the World Anti-Doping Code.

Some of the problems the agency has faced include locating the athletes for tests at their residential camp – and by yesterday, some of them had not reported to camp, while others have been competing in various international races.

In response to allegations that it had not planned the testing procedures well, ADAK said the tests are being conducted according to the required international standards ahead of the World Championships.

“The agency planned for tests on the list of 130 probable athletes that AK provided and since May 2017, we have been carrying out tests on athletes who were on this list to ensure that they all met the mandatory requirements.

“After the trials, many of the athletes who were on the list of probables were not picked to join the national team and instead new names made it to the team. This meant that testing for these athletes had to start afresh before they reported to residential camp on July 9.”

The agency reiterated that the regulations on testing must be adhered to, as demanded by the International Standard for Testing and Investigations.

“It is mandatory to carry out these tests and there should be no notice given to the athletes on when or where the doping control officers would collect their samples. If this is not strictly adhered to ADAK and, by extension the country, will be cited for non-compliance to the World Anti-Doping Code.

“In as much as ADAK and AK are doing all they can to ensure the IAAF requirements are met, we urge the athletes to honour the call to national duty.”

The national team’s manager, Nicholas Maswai, said only the athletes who meet the IAAF rules will be allowed to travel to London.

“ADAK are doing what they were directed to do by IAAF. If an athlete will not have met the requirement(s) by taking the tests, then we will have no choice but to drop them,” said Maswai. “We are also going to drop those athletes who have yet to report to camp.”

Anti-doping body grapples with absentee athletes

Anti-doping Agency of Kenya (Adak) and Athletics Kenya have clarified that they are working together to ensure that doping tests are well planned and all athletes going to London World Championships are tested.

Adak Chief Executive Officer Japhter Rugut said that as much as they are doing all they can to ensure the International Association Athletics Federations (IAAF) requirements are met, the athletes should honour the call to national duty and report to camp as they have been selected to Team Kenya.

“The athletes also need to ensure that they report to camp and are available for the tests,” said Rugut.

He reiterated that the responsibility of athletes to update their whereabouts did not lie with Adak and the athlete would bear the consequences of breaching this protocol.

Rugut was reacting to head coach Julius Kirwa’s appeal to Adak to speed up the mandatory three Out-Of-Competition (OOCT) tests for each of Team Kenya athlete for the World Championships.

Kirwa feared that most of the athletes in his team could be locked out owing to the requirements. Rugut explained that they have had several challenges in having the athletes tested with many of the athletes on the list to the World Championships travelling out of the country to participate in the various Diamond Leagues across the world.

Rugut said that after the trials many of those athletes ,who were in the list of probables did not make the final Team Kenya and instead new names made it to the team.

“This meant that testing for these athletes had to start afresh before they reported to residential camp on July 9. Adak has on many occasions consulted on this with AK top management and senior officials from the Ministry of Sports,” said Rugut.

“There are a number of athletes who have qualified for the London Games in the past two weeks and we have done our best to test them every time their names are provided.”

ADAK PRESS STATEMENT

Our attention has been drawn to misleading remarks by Team Kenya World Championships Coach, Julius Kirwa, appearing in a story in The Daily Nation (DN, Sunday 23rd July, 2017-page 53) with regards to the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya’s (ADAK) role in the upcoming London 2017 World Championships.

In the Story Mr. Kirwa states that ADAK failed to ‘properly plan’ for doping tests to be carried out to athletes scheduled to participate in the championships and that ‘ADAK should have concentrated on testing Team Kenya World Championships probables instead of administering random tests’.

 

We wish to inform the general public that the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) gave Athletics Kenya (AK) mandatory testing requirements that all athletes who would be selected to Team Kenya for the London 2017 World Championships should undergo three (3) Out-Of-Competition (OOCT) Urine tests and one (1) Out-Of-Competition Blood test. Since ADAK is the only institution mandated to carry out tests, AK collaborated with the Agency to ensure that the tests were carried out as per the requirements of IAAF. The Agency planned for tests on the list of 130 probable athletes that AK provided and since May 2017 we have been carrying out tests on athletes who were in this list to ensure that they all met the mandatory requirements.

 

After the trials many of those athletes who were in the list of probables did not make it to be selected to Team Kenya and instead new names made it to the team. This meant that testing for these athletes had to start afresh before they reported to residential camp on 9th July. ADAK has on many occasions consulted on this with AK top management and senior officials from the Ministry of Sports, Culture and the Arts (MOSCA).

The Agency wishes to reiterate that there are laid down regulations on OOCT that need to be adhered to strictly as per the International Standard for Testing and Investigations. It is mandatory that for such tests there should be no notice to the athletes when the Doping Control Officers (DCOs) go to collect their samples. If this is not strictly adhered to, ADAK and by extension the country, will be cited for Non-compliance to the World Anti-Doping Code.

During these past months many of the athletes on the list of probables have been travelling out of the country to participate in the various Diamond Leagues across the world. As an Agency we cannot follow the athletes out of the country to test them and hence we request the National Anti-Doping Organizations (NADOs) of those countries to test them on our behalf. We have managed to test a few of the athletes outside Kenya but majority have been tested within our country. The athletes who have not met the requirements have not been found every time tests are being carried out. The Agency conducted tests at the athletes’ residential camp last week and there are many of them who have not reported to camp and others who are still travelling outside for the Diamond League.

There are a number of athletes who have qualified for the London games in the past 2 weeks and we have done our best to test them every time the names are provided. One of the rules that the IAAF gave was that no athlete should be tested more than once (1) in the residential camp. This makes it difficult for ADAK to plan more than 1 test for the athletes who are recent additions to the camp or for those who could not be found before the camp. However, the Agency is still carrying out tests even as AK consults with IAAF about the new entrants into the Team and how they can best be assisted.

We wish to inform the public that ADAK has been working in conjunction with AK to ensure that the tests are well planned and that all athletes are tested.

In as much as ADAK and AK are doing all they can to ensure the IAAF requirements are met, we urge the athletes to honour the call to national duty as they have been selected to Team Kenya. The athletes also need to ensure that they report to camp and are available for the tests. We wish to reiterate that failure on the part of the athlete to update his or her whereabouts is not on ADAK or AK, and the athlete should be ready to face consequences thereof in the spirit of Strict Liability as per the World Anti-Doping Code.

WADA Legacy Outreach Program joins forces with the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya and the Athletics Integrity Unit

Nairobi, 12 July 2017 – The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) is partnering with the Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) and the newly-formed Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU) to deliver the latest installment of its Legacy Outreach Program, during the IAAF Junior World Championships in Nairobi, Kenya from 12 – 17 July. The Agency’s Legacy Outreach Program, which is delivered during major international sports events, provides additional support to Anti-Doping Organizations (ADOs) in developing and delivering sustainable anti-doping awareness programs. This partnership will raise awareness and promote clean sport to a generation of young athletes, while leaving behind an array of resources for ADAK to use again in the future.

“WADA is pleased to partner with ADAK and the Athletics Integrity Unit to bring the Legacy Outreach Program to young athletes in Nairobi, Kenya,” said Olivier Niggli, Director General, WADA. “The Program has proven to be a great way to work hand in hand with our partners in creating global awareness of anti-doping with athletes and their entourage,” Niggli continued. “By working together and creating resources that can be leveraged time and time again, WADA’s investment has a lasting and meaningful impact,” he continued.

“Along with WADA, ADAK believes that raising awareness is the first step to building understanding,” said Japhter Rugut, CEO of ADAK. “WADA’s Legacy Outreach Program and the knowledge-sharing that this unique partnership brings is greatly appreciated,” Rugut added. “The resources developed by WADA for ADAK will be used for this event and many other events in Kenya, in the future,” he continued. “As a complement to values-based education, Legacy Outreach is one of the best ways to curb doping by reaching athletes as early as possible; informing them of the many anti-doping resources at their disposal; and, informing them of the channels they have to voice concerns regarding any doping that may exist within their teams or federations.”

“The AIU is pleased to partner with WADA and ADAK at one of the IAAF’s biggest events for youth,” said David Howman, Chair of the AIU. “At this early stage in their athletic careers, athletes must be fully empowered to know their rights and responsibilities and we are pleased to play our part in this regard.”

The Legacy Outreach team, which is made up of members from ADAK, AIU and WADA, will be led by athlete ambassadors Tegla Loroupe and Paula Radcliffe. Loroupe, who is a member of WADA’s Athlete Committee, is probably best known as the first African female to win the New York Marathon; and as having led the Refugee Team at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games. Radcliffe, a member of the IAAF’s Athlete Committee, currently holds the world record in the marathon. Both athletes are vocal supporters of the clean sport movement and have firsthand knowledge of the pressures surrounding doping in sport. The Outreach team will invite athletes, coaches and other support staff to take part in fun and educational activities. They will be encouraged to complete the Play True Quiz, which is now available in 39 languages, to sign the Clean Sport Pledge and to share their thoughts on social media using the hashtag #CleanSport. On behalf of the Athletics Integrity Unit (AIU), Paula Radcliffe will encourage athletes to sign the AIU’s Athletes’ Pledge, through which competitors can demonstrate their commitment to clean athletics.

ANTI-DOPING AGENCY OF KENYA (ADAK) TAKES A LEADING ROLE IN PROMOTION OF DOPING FREE GAMES DURING THE WORLD UNDER 18 CHAMPIONSHIP IN NAIROBI

The Anti-Doping Agency of Kenya (ADAK) is at the forefront of promoting a doping-free sporting environment during the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Under 18 Championships to be held in Kenya from Wednesday, 12th July 2017 to Monday, 16th July 2017.
ADAK, through the Medical and Anti-Doping Sub-Committee of the Local Organizing Committee (LOC) has a major role to play during this global event. ADAK has ten (10) Anti-Doping Educators, and is expecting three (3) from WADA and one (1) from IAAF. The WADA and IAAF Educators plus three (3) from ADAK, will be deployed at the Games Village (Kenyatta University), a venue identified to deal specifically with the U18 athletes, where the emphasis will be the values-based education. The remaining seven (7) Educators will be deployed at Kasarani Safaricom Stadium where the focus will be to reach out to other athletes from all sports disciplines as well as the general public patroning the stadium as spectators.
ADAK as the Sample Collection Authority for the World U18 Games has planned to carry out fifty (50) in-competition doping tests, and has deployed ten (10) Doping Control Officer (DCOs) and twenty (20) chaperones for this purpose. IAAF is the Testing and Result Management Authority for the games.
This was revealed during a briefing meeting for Doping Control Officers, Anti-Doping Educators and Chaperones which was held at the Kasarani Safaricom Stadium on Wednesday, 5th July 2017. In the session, ADAK was represented by the Director, Anti-Doping Education and Research, Ms. Agnes Mandu and Director, Compliance &Testing, Ms. Sarah Shibutse on behalf of the Chief Executive Officer, Mr. Japhter Rugut.
The Championship brings together over 1,500 athletes from over 130 countries across the globe. The IAAF World U18 Championship Nairobi 2017 will be the first global Track and Field championship to be held in Kenya. It will also be the final edition of the World U18 Championships as the IAAF’s focus will shift toward driving regional and continental competitions.